Recently I had a discussion where the initial question somewhat baffled me. Having thought about it more, I want to write something about it to see if I can come to a nice conclusion. The question was; Is Continuous Delivery a threat to Content Management? The form of the question predicates that the asker thinks that Continuous Delivery is actually a threat to Content Management, but why?

As someone who tries to take the independent stance but heavily leaning on Content Management for the staple of work, my initial reaction is that no, Content Management is no threat to Continuous Delivery, but nor is Continuous Delivery a threat to Content Management. Both have a place in any internet delivery environment and such a question is a little like comparing apples and pears. But for kicks, let’s look at it in a little more detail.

What is Content Management (CMS)?
Specifically, we are talking about Web Content Management (rather than the general definition). Wikipedia describes this as:

A web content management system is a software system that provides website authoring, collaboration, and administration tools designed to allow users with little knowledge of web programming languages or markup languages to create and manage website content with relative ease. A robust Web Content Management System provides the foundation for collaboration, offering users the ability to manage documents and output for multiple author editing and participation. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_content_management_system)

Systems like SDL Tridion Web make good on the following: allowing non-technical users to edit site content (and even manipulate layout), collaborate on content, version and reuse content across multiple channels and sites. Some systems allow for additional integrations to support content create such as translation systems, DAM etc. and changes can be made to a production website in a matter of minutes. Not all CMS platforms support direct updates but rather they rely on periodic refreshes of the content.

What is Continuous Delivery (CD)?
Continuous Delivery differs in what it, as an approach is trying to resolve. Wikipedia describes it as:

Continuous Delivery is a software engineering approach in which teams produce software in short cycles, ensuring that the software can be reliably released at any time. It aims at building, testing, and releasing software faster and more frequently. The approach helps reduce the cost, time, and risk of delivering changes by allowing for more incremental updates to applications in production. A straightforward and repeatable deployment process is important for continuous delivery. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_delivery)

The focus here is on agility of changes in a development lifecycle with a heavy focus on automation of repetitive tasks to lead to productivity and quality improvements. These automated stages are things like build, test and deployment. They feature integrated products covering things like collaboration, unit tests, versioning and source control and typically this is focused on product (code which could be a website) development which can and often does include editing of assets such as labels, (website) content and binary objects.

Comparing the two
Both have overlap in two areas; versioning control and pipeline management. Both paradigms focus on rapid delivery of assets and both are only comparable if we are talking about the delivery of a website. A CMS is no good for supporting delivery of a desktop application. Whilst many CMSs support the delivery of code and have a web application, SDL Web does not mandate such a thing and you can develop any application you would like with varying degrees of code in the CMS itself. Currently, the recommended practice of SDL is not to include code in CMS, but to develop a separate application and have SDL Web deliver content which it can do in any form you need (e.g. JSON or XHTML). Continuous delivery specializes in the delivery of code and assets.

In Continuous Delivery, you can enter content assets into a versioning system (e.g. Git) and include that in your build which is eventually deployed. Content can be edited with a suitable IDE in a semi- non-technical form. I do not want to say completely non-technical because an IDE is typically still a technical tool. CMS systems tend to focus on empowerment of non-technical users and organizations that use SDL Web have non-technical marketing users editing content either via forms or using tools like Experience Manager. Content that is entered into the versioning system can then be pushed through the delivery pipeline into the deployment together with all the application code. This has an advantage in agility of deployment because the content will always be delivered by the deployment and the content is as available as the application. Where SDL Web sometimes has challenges is that you need to have a single, scaled and redundant source of content for the webapp. This means that always needs to be there to make the web application works. However, separating the two pipelines of code and content using CD and WCM means that you can make minute by minute changes to the website and not require the application to be redeployed. If you want to separate your web application from your CMS, then content can be delivered through content-as-a-service.

Conclusion
Every web application needs content so if you do not have a CMS then you will need to deliver your content through CD. CD will provide enough features to edit and manage content providing you have the right people and you allow the right speed of updates in the form of multiple deployments per day. What you lose by not having a CMS is the features that the CMS would bring such as content inheritance, translation, inline editing, per minute updates of content. For a simple site (i.e. a micro-site), having a full enterprise CMS is perhaps overkill especially if you do not already have a CMS. If you do, reusing content and content editing processes from the existing CMS is a considerable plus.

If your website is larger in content terms than a simple site and is really multiple sites in multiple languages with a high amount of content reuse, then using CMS and CD together, seems to be the ideal solution. You can manage all your content for all your channels (including campaigning) though one tool and develop awesome apps in record time with CD. One is not a threat to the other.

Going forward I would make a recommendation that your deployments are done in a microservice architecture and in that, your CMS content should be delivered as a service (along with all the other things like targeting). This means all deployed sites take advantage of content that is centrally managed, application deployments are not weighed down by large volumes of content assets and CMS features like content targeting are uniformly deployed on all channels.

Photo credit: Ian Brown (Flickr)